Feminicide in Ciudad Juarez

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The Clinic on Human Rights, an undergraduate project at St. Lawrence University, focuses on the mass killings of women on the border.

Solidarity Among Students: Reactions to the Police Shooting and Injuring a Juarez Student

Through our Clinic, we have had many opportunities to skype and connect with people currently at the border. This has allowed our class a way to form a very real and human connection to the violence that is going on in Juarez. One of our Skype sessions was with Angel Estrada, Director of the film "La Tierra Prometida," which gives insight into the world of the maquiladora industry and its effects on one particular family. Since our discussion via skype, a great injustice took place in Juarez against students our same age- this event not only affected Estrada greatly, but it made the severity of the violence in this area resonate more with our class.

Case Studies of Feminicide

Inter-American Court of Human Rights: Cotton Fields Sentence

As part of the Clinic's work, and with the help of Dr. Martha Chew-Sanchez, we were privileged enough to be able to speak with a variety of people in, and around Juarez.

Feminicide in Ciudad Juarez

In our clinic, we have been focusing on feminicide in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico as a case study of the effects of globalization on human rights. In order to understand a complex situation such as the one on the ground in Juarez, it is crucial to be familiar with some background information. 

About Ciudad Juarez:

  • Cd. Juarez is located across the border from El Paso, Texas.
  • The city has a population of around 1.5 million people.
  • There are over 300 maquiladoras in Cd. Juarez. Maquiladoras are assembly plants or foreign factories mainly owned by U.S. based multinational corporations. These factories have policies of cheap labor, long hours and efficient mass production of goods, mostly which are exported to the U.S.
  • President Felipe Calderon states that 90% of the deaths in Cd. Juarez are related to drug organizations, however, there is no evidence to back this statement. In fact, most of the 25,000+ dead are ordinary citizens (Charles Bowden, "Who is Behind 25,000 Deaths?" ).