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Written by johncollins on Dec 11, 2015

877 At its recent meeting in Denver, members of the American Anthropological Association voted overwhelmingly in support of a resolution calling on the AAA to boycott Israeli academic institutions. Following the historic vote I reached out to Ilana Feldman, a member of the group that spearheaded the effort to bring the resolution forward. Feldman is Associate Professor of Anthropology, History, and International Affairs at George Washington University and author of the recently-released monograph Police Encounters: Security and Surveillance in Gaza Under Egyptian Rule (Stanford University Press)...

Written by johncollins on Nov 23, 2015

876 As public debate regarding the recent attacks in Paris continues to reverberate, I reached out to historian Greg Afinogenov, who wrote a widely-shared Facebook post on November 17 calling for a more critical awareness of how global structures of violence operate. Afinogenov is a recently-defended PhD candidate in history at Harvard University, working on Russo-Chinese relations in the long 18th century. He is also an occasional contributor to n+1 and the London Review of Books. Below is a transcript of our conversation, presented here as part of my occasional “Interweaving” series...

Written by Nicole.Eigbrett on Nov 14, 2015

I had the incredible privilege to visit France on three different occasions, beginning in high school exchanges with Lycée Bréquigny in Rennes, in northwestern France (Bretagne). The host students and their families, friends that became pivotal to how I regarded the world revealed that our (U.S.) culture, ideology, and mannerisms are different. Yet I also came to realize that at the end of the day, we all desire the same thing: love, liberty, security, connection, and heck, if success came along with that, even better. Travelling opened those doors for my mind and soul. After three cycles of exchange students, I knew I would return to France.

In August 2011, my sophomore year at St. Lawrence University, I embarked on a semester-long life in Normandy, the north-central province of France. Rouen was only an hour north of Paris by train. New families and faces and landscapes,...

Written by Nicole.Eigbrett on Oct 9, 2015

Where is Rachel Dolezal now? Apparently she’s still holding to her black identity and pregnant. That aside, Dolezal’s case slid further back in my mind following the series of shootings this summer, within my own community and the massacre in Charleston, South Carolina. It suddenly seemed trivial that this woman, who ardently believes she is black, deserved attention—when there were nine, unarmed black individuals in a hall of worship, murdered out of racial hatred.

At the beginning of September, attention was drawn to another individual whom falsified his race to gain notoriety. This man is Michael Derrick Hudson of Fort Wayne, Indiana....

Written by johncollins on Sep 22, 2015

Sometimes when you're out #weavingthestreets you see huge, obvious signs of the people's voices. In other cases you have to look a little harder, like when you're in a neighborhood that is the embodiment of ruling class privilege.

A few minutes ago I was walking through the Salamanca neighborhood of Madrid. In this neighborhood, the world is a world of high-end boutiques and jewelers, exclusive hotels, and street names that calmly state their enduring social dominance: Principe de Vergara, Serrano, Marqués de Villamagna. It is a neighborhood that works very hard to assure its residents that all is well with the world, that the social order is natural and eternal, that there is no need to pay attention to the 25...

Written by Łukasz W. Niparko on Sep 1, 2015


Somewhere between departing from and returning to Europe from North America, this July and August, I have noticed a tremendous shift of rhetoric in the European media. Before my departure I heard about asylum seekers from inter alia Syria seeking their refuge in Europe and often dying on the Mediterranean Sea. Once, I returned, I keep hearing about "migrants" who still keep dying on the boats or while smuggled. Why this shift in rhetoric matters so much and why it is a bit disgusting?

 
First of all, the state parties to the 1951 Convention relating to the status of Refugees (nota bene drafted with the thought of helping the Second World War refugees from Europe) and its Additional Protocol have legal obligation to protect asylum seekers, to accept and review their applications for asylum, and to give them the refugee status with all what follows if the merits...

Written by johncollins on Aug 13, 2015

867 Farewell notes at the Café ComercialI've just arrived in Spain's capital, Madrid, and will be reporting from here for the next ten months or so. Many of my reports will fall within the purview of our "Weaving the Streets" project, part of a larger collaboration between the Weave and the Richard F. Brush Art Gallery. One of the first things that has caught my eye is the recent closure of the city's oldest café: Café Comercial (CC),...

Written by Jana Morgan on Aug 7, 2015

The Foundation is Shaking Beneath Big Oil’s House of Cards

No competitive disadvantage from payment disclosure, says leading natural resource economist

Transparency advocates are fighting to prevent Big Oil from weakening Section 1504 of Dodd-Frank, the landmark oil, gas, and mining payment transparency provision. Section 1504, if properly implemented, will enable citizens to monitor the revenue their governments receive from extractives companies, and help citizens ensure that revenue generated from their countries’ natural resource endowment is put to good use. Before Section 1504 can go into effect, the Securities and Exchange Commission must release an implementing rule. And in order for Section 1504 to work as intended, the implementing regulation must require companies to publicly report their payments for each of their projects...

Written by Łukasz W. Niparko on Aug 5, 2015

The Color of Change has released a powerful video that is definitely world spreading! Check it out:

 

 

"It’s been 77 years since civil rights activist and poet Langston Hughes wrote his chilling poem “Kids Who Die,” which illuminates the horrors of lynchings during the Jim Crow era. Now, as we approach the one year mark of the tragic police killing of Michael Brown and the Ferguson uprising that sparked a growing movement, Hughes' words painfully still ring true today.

Frank Chi, progressive media consultant, and Terrance Green, a filmmaker and strategist, have created a powerful...

Written by johncollins on Jun 28, 2015

More than a decade ago, independent journalist Amy Goodman (the host of Democracy Now!) made a crucial observation about the corporate news media's coverage of the lead-up to the Iraq war and the war's early stage. Noting the tendency of CNN and other networks to turn their coverage over to an endless parade of retired generals, admirals, and other "military experts" (along with the almost total absence of any alternative or critical perspective), and noting how the major networks also borrowed the title of their coverage ("Operation Iraqi Feedom") directly from the Pentagon, Goodman asked,...