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Written by lgpend13 on Jan 9, 2016

913 My name is Lydia Pendleton. I’m a junior at St. Lawrence University living in Madrid this year and this is my first post for “Weaving the Streets & People’s History Archive” (WSPHA) project. I’ve always had a profound interest for all topics anthropological or Spanish related and I am happy to say I found a topic that interests me as much as I hope it will interest all of you.

 

During my first few weeks living here in Madrid, I would get off the metro every day to go to class and walk by the large building on the corner which was once a student residence called San Juan Evangelista, which looked abandoned even though I always noticed people going in and out as they please. Instead of seeing it as an eyesore, the building intrigued me. The first thing I noticed was the large sign in front of the building with a black spray-painted silhouette of an alien. At first I had no idea...

Written by kkcrea95 on Jan 9, 2016

912 I was offered the opportunity to participate in the WSPHA project this summer, by the program director of the St. Lawrence University study abroad program in Spain. I accepted this offer because I love learning about new cultures from the grassroots level, it forces me out of my comfort zone and stimulates growth as a person. I applied to study in Spain in order to perfect my knowledge of the language, but I also wanted to see the effects of the European financial crisis on the Spanish population. I am an International Economics major so I believed coming to the country I would get a stronger grasp on the causes and effects of the global financial crisis, whilst simultaneously improving my language speaking skills. The first thing I noticed when coming to Madrid, was the amount of homeless people, beggars, and street vendors. There are people of all ages and ethnicities...

Written by DrP on Jan 9, 2016

907 Sanctioned by the Obama administration, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has begun deporting Central American refugees, marking the latest dark turn in U.S. immigration politics.

Pamela Constable for the Washington Post reports that federal agents are raiding homes in Georgia and Texas, among other states, where gainfully employed refugees are believed to reside. The agents ship detainees to deportation centers near the southern border from which they’re dispersed to their homelands. 

It is unclear how the refugees’ locations are revealed, though some have work permits and provisional social...

Written by johncollins on Jan 6, 2016

880 2015 may well be remembered as the year of Europe's Great Refugee Crisis, but it's worth noting that while people desperately continue to flee conflict and try to reach European shores, the story has been rapidly disappearing from mainstream media coverage. It's a good reminder of how the media machine produces amnesia just as relentlessly as the machines of global capitalism, imperialism and militarism produce human suffering and displacement.

In order to spotlight the continuing importance of the refugee story, I reached out to my friend Diego López Calvin, a Spanish photographer whose work first came to my attention in 2004 when I was living in Madrid. I attended a very moving exhibition devoted to photographs of contemporary Palestine and ...

Written by johncollins on Dec 11, 2015

877 At its recent meeting in Denver, members of the American Anthropological Association voted overwhelmingly in support of a resolution calling on the AAA to boycott Israeli academic institutions. Following the historic vote I reached out to Ilana Feldman, a member of the group that spearheaded the effort to bring the resolution forward. Feldman is Associate Professor of Anthropology, History, and International Affairs at George Washington University and author of the recently-released monograph Police Encounters: Security and Surveillance in Gaza Under Egyptian Rule (Stanford University Press)...

Written by johncollins on Nov 23, 2015

876 As public debate regarding the recent attacks in Paris continues to reverberate, I reached out to historian Greg Afinogenov, who wrote a widely-shared Facebook post on November 17 calling for a more critical awareness of how global structures of violence operate. Afinogenov is a recently-defended PhD candidate in history at Harvard University, working on Russo-Chinese relations in the long 18th century. He is also an occasional contributor to n+1 and the London Review of Books. Below is a transcript of our conversation, presented here as part of my occasional “Interweaving” series...

Written by Nicole.Eigbrett on Nov 14, 2015

I had the incredible privilege to visit France on three different occasions, beginning in high school exchanges with Lycée Bréquigny in Rennes, in northwestern France (Bretagne). The host students and their families, friends that became pivotal to how I regarded the world revealed that our (U.S.) culture, ideology, and mannerisms are different. Yet I also came to realize that at the end of the day, we all desire the same thing: love, liberty, security, connection, and heck, if success came along with that, even better. Travelling opened those doors for my mind and soul. After three cycles of exchange students, I knew I would return to France.

In August 2011, my sophomore year at St. Lawrence University, I embarked on a semester-long life in Normandy, the north-central province of France. Rouen was only an hour north of Paris by train. New families and faces and landscapes,...

Written by Nicole.Eigbrett on Oct 9, 2015

Where is Rachel Dolezal now? Apparently she’s still holding to her black identity and pregnant. That aside, Dolezal’s case slid further back in my mind following the series of shootings this summer, within my own community and the massacre in Charleston, South Carolina. It suddenly seemed trivial that this woman, who ardently believes she is black, deserved attention—when there were nine, unarmed black individuals in a hall of worship, murdered out of racial hatred.

At the beginning of September, attention was drawn to another individual whom falsified his race to gain notoriety. This man is Michael Derrick Hudson of Fort Wayne, Indiana....

Written by johncollins on Sep 22, 2015

Sometimes when you're out #weavingthestreets you see huge, obvious signs of the people's voices. In other cases you have to look a little harder, like when you're in a neighborhood that is the embodiment of ruling class privilege.

A few minutes ago I was walking through the Salamanca neighborhood of Madrid. In this neighborhood, the world is a world of high-end boutiques and jewelers, exclusive hotels, and street names that calmly state their enduring social dominance: Principe de Vergara, Serrano, Marqués de Villamagna. It is a neighborhood that works very hard to assure its residents that all is well with the world, that the social order is natural and eternal, that there is no need to pay attention to the 25...

Written by Łukasz W. Niparko on Sep 1, 2015


Somewhere between departing from and returning to Europe from North America, this July and August, I have noticed a tremendous shift of rhetoric in the European media. Before my departure I heard about asylum seekers from inter alia Syria seeking their refuge in Europe and often dying on the Mediterranean Sea. Once, I returned, I keep hearing about "migrants" who still keep dying on the boats or while smuggled. Why this shift in rhetoric matters so much and why it is a bit disgusting?

 
First of all, the state parties to the 1951 Convention relating to the status of Refugees (nota bene drafted with the thought of helping the Second World War refugees from Europe) and its Additional Protocol have legal obligation to protect asylum seekers, to accept and review their applications for asylum, and to give them the refugee status with all what follows if the merits...